Lunenburg Log Cabins

Well, it did take until Tuesday, but here is the long weekend tutorial! I have named this quilt “Lunenburg Log Cabins” because the block is a very simple, log cabin-like block and the colours make me think of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia and the brightly coloured houses there. If you’re Canadian, you’re definitely familiar with Lunenburg; if not, here’s a photo from the Town of Lunenburg’s tourism website:

Gov_95-377-950-700-90-rd-255-255-255

These little frame houses aren’t the most colourful I’ve seen, but you get the idea. And here’s the quilt top:

LLCdone2

Ta da! As I said, this block is very simple so others may have done something along these lines – but I did come up with this design on my own so any similarity is purely coincidental! (But if you have a similar design, let me know as I’d be happy to add a link to your version, too.)

If you’d like to make this quilt, here’s how you can do it. (I will update with yardage as soon as I calculate it!)

08/22/14 – Updated to add yardage (sorry it took so long! The calculations for the turquoise/pink/white solids are on the generous side):
Print for windows in turquoise blocks – 1/2 yard
Turquoise solid – 3 yards
Print for windows in pink blocks – 1/4 yard (or fat quarter if you can cut 12 – 6 1/2″ squares)
Pink solid – 1 yard
Purple solid for windows in purple blocks – scrap (or fat quarter)
Purple print for blocks – scrap (or fat quarter)
White solid for sashing – 1 1/4 yard
Beige solid for corner stones – 1/4 yard (or fat quarter)

You’ll need:
30 blocks total (any combination that you like – but the following is what I did).
23 Turquoise Blue blocks:
Prints for windows – 46 – 3 1/2 inch squares
Turquoise Blue solid – 46 – 6 1/2 inch squares; 46 – 2 1/2 x 6 1/2 inch rectangles; 46 – 2 1/2 x 4 1/2 inch rectangles; 46 – 1 1/2 x 4 1/2 inch rectangles; and, 46 – 1 1/2 x 3 1/2 inch rectangles
6 Pink blocks:
Print for windows – 12 – 3 1/2 inch squares
Pink solid – 12 – 6 1/2 inch squares; 12 – 2 1/2 x 6 1/2 inch rectangles; 12 – 2 1/2 x 4 1/2 inch rectangles; 12 – 1 1/2 x 4 1/2 inch rectangles; and, 12 – 1 1/2 x 3 1/2 inch rectangles
1 Print block:
Purple solid for windows: 2 – 6 1/2 inch squares
Purple Print – 2 – 6 1/2 inch squares; 2 – 2 1/2 x 6 1/2 inch rectangles; 2 – 2 1/2 x 4 1/2 inch rectangles; 2 – 1 1/2 x 4 1/2 inch rectangles; and, 2 – 1 1/2 x 3 1/2 inch rectangles

To finish:
White solid – 71 12 1/2 x 2 1/2 inch sashing strips
Beige solid – 42 2 1/2 inch square cornerstones

Each block needs these parts:

LLCparts

Starting with your 3 1/2 inch square “window” and using the log cabin method, sew a 1 1/2 x 3 1/2 inch rectangle to one side (if your “window” print is directional, you might want to take note of the orientation of the blocks and sew the strips on with that in mind – the 1 1/2 inch strips face the centre of the block, towards the centre seams. See photos below).

LLC1

Add the 1 1/2 x 4 1/2 inch rectangle to the next adjacent side.

LLC2

Add the 2 1/2 x 4 1/2 inch rectangle to the next adjacent side.

LLC3

Add the 2 1/2 x 6 1/2 inch rectangle to the next adjacent side to finish the small block.

LLC4

Sew half of the 6 1/2 inch squares in place to the right side of the window blocks, orienting the 1 1/2 inch wide strips to the bottom and right. Sew the remaining half of the 6 1/2 inch squares to the left of the window blocks, orienting the 1 1/2 inch strips to the top and left. If you’re using directional “window” fabric, it really helps to lay out your blocks before sewing so they go together the way you want – my “window” fabric was not directional, but I did have a preferred orientation for some of the blocks so I stacked the blocks up the way I wanted them to go together before beginning to sew.

LLC5

Sew the two halves of the block together to make the main block.

LLCBlock2

Sorry – no photos for this next part, but I think it’s fairly self-explanatory (let me know if not and I will try to add something to make things more clear!). Refer to the finished quilt top photo as well – it will help you visualize the finished rows.

Lay out your blocks in 6 rows of 5 blocks, positioned the way you want them to go together, orienting the “windows” so that they are in the upper left of each block. Sew a 12 1/2 x 2 1/2 inch sashing strip to the sides, attaching the blocks together in a row (you’ll need 6 sashing strips to attach 5 blocks together in a row).

Sew 6 – 2 1/2 inch square cornerstones to the short 2 1/2 inch edge of 5 sashing strips, beginning and ending with a cornerstone. Make 7 rows of cornerstones/sashing strips. Sew the cornerstones/sashing strip rows to the top of each of your block rows, adding one at the bottom of the final row. Sew the rows together to complete the quilt top.

And that’s it! This one is pretty easy to sew and goes together really quickly. Here’s another view of the top and I’ll add an updated photo when the quilt is finally complete.

LLCdone3

Enjoy!

L

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